Recognise common 2D and 3D shapes presented in different orientations, and know that rectangles, triangles, cuboids and pyramids are not always similar to one another (3)

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Description

Pupils need a lot of experience in exploring and discussing common 2D and 3D shapes. In the process, they should learn to recognise and name, at a minimum:

  • rectangles (including squares), circles, and triangles
  • cuboids (including cubes), cylinders, spheres and pyramids.

Pupils need to be able to recognise common shapes when they are presented in a variety of orientations and sizes and relative proportions, including large shapes outside the classroom (such as a rectangle marked on the playground or a circle on a netball court). Pupils should be able to describe, using informal language (for example, “long and thin”), the differences between non-similar examples of the same shapes, and recognise that these are still examples of the given shape.

Pupils should practise distinguishing a given named shape type from plausible distractors. These activities should involve exploring shapes (for example, shapes cut from card) rather than only looking at pictures.

Language focus

Shape a: “This is not a triangle because it has 4 sides.”

Shape b or e: “This is a triangle because it has 3 straight sides.”

Shape c or d: “This is not a triangle because it has 6 sides.”

Shape f: “This is not a triangle because some sides are curved.”

Additional information

Objectives

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